Getaround

Getaround is an on-demand carsharing community. Rent, unlock and drive - all with your phone! Rates start at $5/hour including insurance and no membership fees. Car owners conveniently share their cars earning $500-$1000 a month. Getaround won TechCrunch Disrupt in 2011 and launched on-demand carsharing in 2013. Getaround has grown to over 200,000 members across the US. Getaround was founded by Sam Zaid, Jessica Scorpio and Elliot Kroo and is currently headquartered in San Francisco, California.



about the company

Founders

Jessica Scorpio is a Founder and VP of Marketing at Getaround, which was created to leverage the 1B+ cars on the planet to create a cleaner, smarter and more efficient transportation system through a marketplace for peer-to-peer car sharing. Prior to launching Getaround, she completed the inaugural Graduate Studies Program at Singularity University (SU '09), a new school launched by Ray Kurzweil, Peter Diamandis, NASA, and Google that focuses on inspiring a cadre of leaders to understand and facilitate the development of exponentially advancing technologies in order to address humanity's grand challenges. Jessica also worked in the Government of Canada for a number of years, as a political aide to the Minister of International Cooperation, Secretary of State (Foreign Affairs and International Trade), and as a writer in a branch of the Prime Minister's Office. Jessica is also the former Founder and CEO of IDEAL, a not-for-profit network for entrepreneurs and young leaders.She lives in San Francisco.

Sam is Founder & CEO at Getaround, a community marketplace for sharing underutilized personal vehicles. He is a 2008 Microsoft Code Award winner, an E&Y Entrepreneur of the Year 2009, a Google Scholarship recipient and alumni of the Singularity University Graduate Studies Program in artificial intelligence and robotics. He is an active member of the technology community, and a co-founder of Fresh Founders, a club for young technology entrepreneurs. Sam holds a degree in Engineering Physics with First-Class Distinction from Queen's University.

Elliot Kroo is a Founder and Director of Engineering at Getaround. Former Googler and early Street View engineer. Previously founded WingsForCats, a mobile game studio. Last iPhone game was downloaded over 2M times.

Getaround in the press

May 11, 2016

Tesla was just the beginning. Introducing the connected car landscape

Finding value in car dataThe OBD-II dongle area has become increasingly crowded with many firms offering a developer platform for connected car apps. Since then, in just a four year period, the connected car market has transformed significantly. Tesla showed us the power of a truly connected car with API’s that could remotely access a vehicle’s data and fix issues with over-the-air updates. Today, the connected car market is no longer a buzzword or concept. A high-resolution version of the VB Profiles Connected Cars Landscape is available for download here.

May 8, 2016

Who Has Your Back? Government Data Requests 2016

Publish transparency reportsWe award companies a star in this category if they publish useful data about how many times the government sought user data and how often the companies provide user data to the government. FlipKey requires a warrant for user content or location data and promises to inform users of law enforcement access requests. This analysis is specific to government access requests for user data, and within that context we see ample room for improvement by this budding industry. Inform users about law enforcement data requests. As with any rich trove of data, law enforcement is increasingly turning to the distributed workforce as part of their investigations.

May 5, 2016

Is The “Sharing Economy” Sharing Your Data With Law Enforcement? – Consumerist

Is The “Sharing Economy” Sharing Your Data With Law Enforcement? While these new platforms might be opening up the so-called “sharing” economy, some of them may also be a bit too willing to share user data with law enforcement. “This is a wake-up call to the gig economy companies and the people who use them. • Do they publish guidelines regarding their law enforcement related policies? • Do they publish a transparency report regarding requests from law enforcement?

May 5, 2016

Electronic Frontier Foundation

The sixth annual “Who Has Your Back” report from the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) surveyed the biggest providers in the gig economy to find out. “This is a wake-up call to the gig economy companies and the people who use them. As the first set of companies we looked at has improved so substantially, we decided it was time to turn to the sharing economy. These companies connect people offering services to people purchasing them, and in the process they have access to vast amounts of personal data. But how well do these companies protect your information from the government?

April 27, 2016

Drivy, the peer-based car rental startup, raises Euro 31 million, gaining on Turo

Thanks to this investment, Drivy plans to open services in Britain and two other (unnamed) European countries this year. This fresh investment brings the total raised to date to Euro 47 million. Its US rival Turo entered Canada as a first international market earlier this month, and has raised a total of $101 million to date. Drivy does not yet operate in the United States or Canada, where rival upstart Turo offers a comparable service. Headquartered in Paris, the startup Drivy aims to connect people who want to rent out their cars with people who want to drive them.

April 26, 2016

Are We Experiencing Transportation’s Instagram Moment? — Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers

Desire vs. EconomicsWe know that Tesla is not the only one talking about a 200-mile range electric car. We have seen Tesla capture the spirit of consumer desire by building the best car in its category, not simply by building an electric car. Moreover, this record-breaking enthusiasm for electric vehicles (EVs) is occurring at a time when oil prices are hitting a 10-year low, recently down to 30 dollars a barrel. The auto market is massive—17 million new vehicles sell every year in U.S. alone, and the used car market is three times larger. The best car today just happens to be electric (if pre-sales are any measure).

April 26, 2016

Are we experiencing transportation’s Instagram moment?

Desire vs. EconomicsWe know that Tesla is not the only one talking about a 200-mile range electric car. We have seen Tesla capture the spirit of consumer desire by building the best car in its category, not simply by building an electric car. The auto market is massive—17 million new vehicles sell every year in US alone, and the used car market is three times larger. Moreover, this record breaking enthusiasm for electric vehicles (EVs) is occurring at a time when oil prices are hitting a 10-year low, recently down to 30 dollars a barrel. The best car today just happens to be electric (if pre-sales are any measure).

Jan. 17, 2016

No turning back in race to fully autonomous cars

"The magic leap of technology has already been made," said Google's Krafcik. Imagine paying for cars or transportation as you would for a time-share vacation condo, or as ZipCar does today. Krafcik, who formerly led Hyundai Motor America, talked about 94-year-old Florence Swanson of Austin, Texas, who last year designed a guitar-player graphic for the door of Google's car. To understand the contrasting perspectives, comments made this week by John Krafcik, CEO of Google's Self-Driving Car Project, and Mark Reuss, head of General Motors global product development, are revealing. "Mobility should be open to the millions around the world who don't have the privilege of holding a driver's license," said John Krafcik, CEO of Google's Self-Driving Car Project.

Jan. 12, 2016

Auto industry goes head-to-head with Silicon Valley’s self-driving innovators

We can expect to see more changes in an exciting year ahead as auto companies become mobility services and tech companies become auto companies. To break new ground, auto companies are becoming tech companies. Google and Tesla may be pushing full-speed ahead in their self-driving car development and testing, but auto manufacturers aren’t sitting idly by. Auto manufacturers are predicting self-driving car consumerization in three to four years, versus Tesla’s expectation of one year and Google’s current deployment of cars already in California. We’re in the midst of a significant transition for auto companies as they realize a future where people may not want or need to own vehicles.

Jan. 4, 2016

At CES, self-driving cars, auto gadgets grab spotlight

Tuesday, Herbert Diess, CEO of Volkswagen Passenger Cars, is expected to unveil an electric car that may momentarily divert media coverage from the company's diesel emissions scandal. Another piece likely will go to startups that have no previous experience with making vehicles, Kaas said. Tech companies also face uncertainty over how they make money from new mobility, Kaas warned. Consumer acceptance of electric vehicles has been tepid at best. "There is cross-fertilization going on between the auto manufacturing companies and the newer mobility services players," Kaas said.